Sep 28, 2008

Welcoming Sanjay Singh to the blogosphere



The Indian HR blogosphere is getting more and more senior professionals who are starting to blog.

Sanjay Singh, VP HR at Whirlpool Asia just started a blog and in his first post he touchs on the the trouble with Leadership Forecasting and what can be done about it:

the biggest challenge lies in accepting the notion that we can predict the business needs (or even the sahpe & size of the business, in 2 years) - Wall street is surely smarting over this assumption.
So if we cannot predict the needs of business, it does severely handicap any ability to predict the Talent needs.
Short point - Talent Forecasting is dead !!
That is certainly bad news for all users & professionals around the Talent Space, including me ...
The answer, I guess, lies in seeking more versatile Leaders who have adaptability as certainly a key strength.


Abhijit Bhadhuri blogs about meeting hot shot headhunting firm Egon Zehnder partner and author of Great People Decisions Claudio Fernandez-Araoz (email:Claudio.Fernandez.Araoz@ezi.net) who is listed by Businessweekmagazine as one of the most influential headhunters.
he had asked the legendary Egon Zehnder himself, “… what makes a person successful?” Egon’s answer, “Luck!! Lucky to be born at a certain time, in a certain country, in a certain socio-economic group, lucky to get a certain education etc. Maybe I should have asked him what the SECOND most important reason for success was.”, Claudio adds wistfully.
I also asked him questions. How many people should interview a candidate? Claudio recommends no more than three people meet a potential candidate and spend two hours each. Beyond that you hit a Type II error ie you are likely to reject a good candidate if more than three people evaluate a candidate.
And Indraneel Roy looks at who should be blamed for the financial mess and why precious little is being done about it:
The fact that not a single human being has been held accountable ( not counting those "fired with a fat severance") for 1 trillion dollar debacle is simply astounding. In fact, Hank the saviour has come up with a brilliant plan to kill the 'toxic assets' and save the 'toxic banker'. What a stroke of genius!
The events unfolding around us are testimony to the fundamental problem that nobody is willing to address. The problem of not just a few bad apples, but an entire rotten orchard. I remember a comment made by an Indian politician several years ago ...
"The problem is not when one becomes corrupt, its when one starts believing that corruption is the new normal"
This is a case where several individuals, over time, came to the conclusion that collusion, non-disclosure, public lies (obfuscation taken to the extreme), in-group favor trading, flawed ratings, and complete lack of accountability ... had become the new normal. These individuals are now trying to quickly shift the blame on to anything other than them - helped, in part, by the growing panic that the common man will take the hit.